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Is lifetime inequality mainly due to differences across people established early in life or to differences in luck experienced over the working lifetime?

Wage ratios between different percentiles of the wage distribution have moved in parallel and then diverged in the U.S. in the last 50 years. In this paper, I study the theoretical response of wage ratios to skill-biased technical change and trade integration.

We find that about 40% of a cohort of young Canadian men have been employed at some time with an employer for which their father also worked, and 6%-9% have the same employer in adulthood.

We find that about 40% of a cohort of young Canadian men have been employed at some time with an employer for which their father also worked, and 6%-9% have the same employer in adulthood.

This paper investigates the effect of linguistic diversity on redistribution in a broad cross-section of countries. We use the notion of “linguistic distances” and show that the commonly used fractionalization index, which ignores linguistic distances, yields insignificant results.

This article instead argues that information about inequalities in health across individuals as opposed to information about social group health differences is generally of little use to egalitarians.

Inequality is a contentious topic in economics, and its effects on individual welfare remains an open questions. We address it from the perspective of the economics of happiness. We draw from our research on the topic, based on new empirical evidence for Latin America.

This paper considers how identity, a person's sense of self, affects economic outcomes. We incorporate the psychology and sociology of identity into an economic model of behavior.