Yana Gallen

Yana Gallen is an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. She is a labor economist studying the gender wage gap. Her research focuses on understanding the sources of the gender pay gap--preferences, discrimination, or productivity? She is also interested in the impact of family friendly policies on the labor market, particularly looking at indirect or unanticipated effects of policy reforms. Many of her projects use Danish register data linking workers and firms.

Le Wang

Le Wang is Chong K. Liew Chair and Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma. He currently serves as an Associate Editor of Econometric Reviews, Journal of Labor Research, and China Economic Review. He also holds a special term professorship at Jinan University. Prior to joining OU, he has held positions at the University of Alabama, the University of New Hampshire, and University of Minnesota. He was also a Women and Public Policy Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School. He received his Ph.D in Economics from Southern Methodist University in 2006 and his B.A.

Joseph Mullins

Joseph Mullins is an Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario. His current research examines how the incentives of various government policies affect child development by shaping parental decision-making. He has recently studied the effect of federal anti-poverty initiatives in the US on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children, using data to determine how mothers respond to different labor supply incentives, and the relative importance of two key resources - time and money - in the developmental process.

Marcy Carlson

Marcia (Marcy) Carlson is Professor of Sociology (and Associate Director for Training at the Center for Demography and Ecology, and Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interests center on the links between family contexts and the wellbeing of children and parents. Her recent work is focused on fertility and family patterns among U.S. unmarried parents, with a particular eye toward growing family complexity and its implications for individual wellbeing and societal inequality.

Brant Abbott

Brant Abbott is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He is a macroeconomist working on inequality, human capital, and education decisions. His work primarily investigates how human capital is interrelated with overall economic inequality. For example, he investigates how economic inequality affects the distribution of human capital in future generations, and how accounting for the value of human capital changes measurements of economic inequality.

Manasi Deshpande

Manasi Deshpande is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Chicago Department of Economics and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research interests include the long-term effects of social insurance and public assistance programs and the interaction between these programs and labor markets. Her dissertation on the long-term effects of disability programs received the 2015 APPAM Dissertation Award, the 2015 Upjohn Institute Dissertation Award, and the 2016 NASI John Heinz Dissertation Award. She received a Ph.D.

Michael Massoglia

Michael Massoglia is the Vilas Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work focuses on the social consequences of the expansion of the penal system, the relationship between the use of legal controls and demographic change in the United States, and patterns and consequences of criminal behavior over the life course. Current research projects examine historical variation in U.S. criminal deportations as well as the relationship between incarceration and neighborhood attainment and racial composition.

David Grusky

David B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S.

Joel Kaiyuan Han

Joel Kaiyuan Han is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Quinlan School of Business, Loyola University Chicago.  As an undergraduate, he assisted in research on labor and education economics at the Economic Research Center.

His general research interests are in public economics, empirical microeconomics, and social interactions. His current research covers topics of neighborhood change and its effects on resident children, with a special focus on how parents respond to such changes through parenting behaviors or through neighborhood exit.