Marcy Carlson

Marcia (Marcy) Carlson is Professor of Sociology (and Associate Director for Training at the Center for Demography and Ecology, and Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interests center on the links between family contexts and the wellbeing of children and parents. Her recent work is focused on fertility and family patterns among U.S. unmarried parents, with a particular eye toward growing family complexity and its implications for individual wellbeing and societal inequality.

Manasi Deshpande

Manasi Deshpande is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Chicago Department of Economics and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research interests include the long-term effects of social insurance and public assistance programs and the interaction between these programs and labor markets. Her dissertation on the long-term effects of disability programs received the 2015 APPAM Dissertation Award, the 2015 Upjohn Institute Dissertation Award, and the 2016 NASI John Heinz Dissertation Award. She received a Ph.D.

Michael Massoglia

Michael Massoglia is the Vilas Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work focuses on the social consequences of the expansion of the penal system, the relationship between the use of legal controls and demographic change in the United States, and patterns and consequences of criminal behavior over the life course. Current research projects examine historical variation in U.S. criminal deportations as well as the relationship between incarceration and neighborhood attainment and racial composition.

David Grusky

David B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S.

Joel Kaiyuan Han

Joel Kaiyuan Han is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Quinlan School of Business, Loyola University Chicago.  As an undergraduate, he assisted in research on labor and education economics at the Economic Research Center.

His general research interests are in public economics, empirical microeconomics, and social interactions. His current research covers topics of neighborhood change and its effects on resident children, with a special focus on how parents respond to such changes through parenting behaviors or through neighborhood exit. 

Richard V. Reeves

Richard Reeves is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Economic Studies, where he also co-directs the Center on Children and Families. He is also an associate director of CentreForum in London. Before his move to Washington, DC in the summer of 2012, he worked as director of strategy to the UK's Deputy Prime Minister, where he led the Government's work on social mobility. He is a former director of Demos.

Rebecca Myerson

Rebecca Myerson is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Economics. She was previously a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, where her field of specialization was applied econometrics. Before coming to Chicago, Rebecca spent four years conducting global health research, including one year at Peking University as a Fulbright scholar and three years at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, Washington.

Bruce Meyer

Bruce Meyer, the McCormick Foundation Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, studies poverty and inequality, tax policy, welfare policy, unemployment insurance, workers' compensation, minority entrepreneurship, the health care safety net, and labor supply. His most recent work includes research on the effects of welfare and tax reform on the well-being of single mothers, models and methods to analyze labor supply, changes in poverty and inequality, the effects of disability, and the effects of changes in the health care safety net.

Tim Kautz

Tim Kautz is a researcher at Mathematica Policy Research. He was a co-organizer of HCEO's Conference on Measuring and Assessing Skills. Kautz is an editor and co-author of a book that explores the importance of social-emotional skills, “The Myth of Achievement Tests: The GED and the Role of Character in American Life.” His research interests include education, inequality, and health.