Author(s)  
Michael Bar
Moshe Hazan
Oksana Leukhina
David Weiss
Hosny Zoabi

A negative relationship between income and fertility has persisted for so long that its existence is often taken for granted. One economic theory builds on this relationship and argues that rising inequality leads to greater differential fertility between rich and poor. We show that the relationship between income and fertility has flattened between 1980 and 2010 in the US, a time of increasing inequality, as high income families increased their fertility. These facts challenge the standard theory. We propose that marketization of parental time costs can explain the changing relationship between income and fertility. We show this result both theoretically and quantitatively, after disciplining the model on US data. We explore implications of changing differential fertility for aggregate human capital. Additionally, policies, such as the minimum wage, that affect the cost of marketization, have a negative effect on the fertility and labor supply of high income women. We end by discussing the insights of this theory to the economics of marital sorting.

Publication Type  
Article
Journal  
Journal of Economic Growth
Volume  
23
Issue Number  
4
Pages  
427-463
JEL Codes  
E24: Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital
J13: Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
J24: Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
J31: Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
J38: Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs: Public Policy
Keywords  
income inequality
marketization
differential fertility
human capital
minimum wage