Author(s)  
Tom Krebs, Moritz Kuhn, Mark Wright

We use data from the Survey of Consumer Finance and Survey of Income Program Participation to show that young households with children are under-insured against the risk that an adult member of the household dies. We develop a tractable macroeconomic model with human capital risk, age-dependent returns to human capital investment, and endogenous borrowing constraints due to the limited pledgeability of human capital. We show analytically that, consistent with the life insurance data, in equilibrium young households are borrowing constrained and under-insured. A calibrated version of the model can quantitatively account for the life-cycle variation of life-insurance holdings, financial wealth, earnings, and consumption inequality observed in the US data. Our analysis implies that a reform that makes consumer bankruptcy more costly, like the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005, leads to a substantial increase in the volume of both credit and insurance.

JEL Codes  
E21: Macroeconomics: Consumption; Saving; Wealth
E24: Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital
D52: Incomplete Markets
J24: Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
Keywords  
human capital risk
limited enforcement
life insurance