Stefanie Schurer

Stefanie Schurer is an Associate Professor in the School of Economics at the University of Sydney. Her research interest is the Economics of Human Development. Most of her current projects explore the evolution of skills, preferences, and health over the lifecourse and the role that parents and the public sector play in determining these skills. She is involved in several linked administrative data projects in Australia, evaluating among others the impact of early-life medical care and cash/in-kind transfers on children’s skill development.

Kate Ho

Kate Ho is a Professor of Economics and the Co-director of the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University. Prior to this, she was an Associate Professor of Economics at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the industrial organization of the medical care market.

Barbara Wolfe

Barbara Wolfe is the Richard A. Easterlin Professor of Economics, Population Health Sciences, and Public Affairs and Faculty Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses broadly on poverty and health issues.

Rong Hai

Rong Hai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Miami. She was previously a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Center for the Economics of Human Development and Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at University of Chicago from 2013 to 2016.. Her research interests are Public Economics, Labor Economics, Health Economics, and Household Finance.

Hai received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013.

Elaine Liu

Elaine M. Liu is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Houston. She received her B.A. from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University. Professor Liu’s research lies at the intersection of the fields of development economics, health economics, labor economics and behavioral economics. Her research focuses on the applied microeconomic issues in China and in Taiwan. Her recent work examines the impact of maternal stress on fetal losses and birth outcomes.

Xu Lin

Xu Lin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wayne State University. Her research fields include Econometrics, Labor Economics and Health Economics. She is particularly interested in theoretical specifications and estimations of spatial autoregressive models, as well as empirical applications of theses models to analyze social interaction effects in a variety of behaviors and outcomes. Prior to joining Wayne State University, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Tsinghua University, P.R.China.

Rusty Tchernis

Rusty Tchernis is a Professor of Economics in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). His primary areas of research are Applied Econometrics, Health Economics, and Labor Economics. Within these fields he is interested in program evaluation, spatial econometrics, and Bayesian methods, as well as the economics of childhood obesity.

Jason Fletcher

Jason Fletcher is a professor of public affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. A specialist in health economics, economics of education and child and adolescent health policy, Fletcher focuses his research on examining social network effects on adolescent education and health outcomes, combining genetics and social science research, estimating long-term consequences of childhood mental illness, and child and adolescent mental health policy.

Margaret Triyana

Margaret Triyana is Visiting Assistant Professor at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She was previously Assistant Professor at the Nanyang Technological University. Her research focuses on two main themes. The first theme concentrates on early life conditions and human capital outcomes in developing countries. Her projects range from analyzing the effects of in-utero interventions to early life pollution. The second theme focuses on health inequality in developing countries.

Sean Sylvia

Sean Sylvia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the design and evaluation of health interventions and policies in China. In recent projects he has studied performance-based incentives for providers, school-based health and nutrition programs, early childhood development interventions, and the measurement of and interventions to improve the quality of primary care.

Sylvia received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in 2014.