Bobby Chung

Bobby Chung is a PhD candidate of Economics at Clemson University. His early works focus on the signaling aspect of occupational licensing.

Bobby's job market paper examines the importance of childhood environment by looking at how adults affect young people through social networks.

Joseph Mullins

Joseph Mullins is an Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario. His current research examines how the incentives of various government policies affect child development by shaping parental decision-making. He has recently studied the effect of federal anti-poverty initiatives in the US on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children, using data to determine how mothers respond to different labor supply incentives, and the relative importance of two key resources - time and money - in the developmental process.

Aaron Sojourner

Sojourner is a labor economist and associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. His research focuses on three areas: (1) effects of labor-market institutions on economic productivity and in politics, (2) policies to promote efficient and equitable development of human capital with a focus on early childhood and K-12 education systems, and (3) behavioral economic approaches to consumer financial decisions. In 2016, he received the John T. Dunlop Scholar Award from the U.S.

Fan Wang

Fan Wang is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Houston. His areas of expertise are development economics, applied microeconomics, and labor. His research focuses on issues related to financial access and human capital formation in developing economies. Some of his recent work looks at the impact of formal credit market expansion on physical and human capital accumulation in Thailand. He is also studying the importance of financial and informational constraints in explaining the heterogeneity in early childhood human capital accumulation.

Youngmin Park

Youngmin Park is a Senior Economist at the Bank of Canada. He is interested in identifying potential inefficiencies associated with differential human capital investment across families and designing policies to mitigate them. He is also interested in understanding market forces that shift returns to acquired human capital and change wage inequality over time.

Park received his Ph.D. from the University of Western Ontario in 2016.

Kyle Herkenhoff

Kyle Herkenhoff is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Minnesota and visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. He received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2014, and his research, which focuses on the interaction of labor markets and consumer credit markets, places equal weight on theory and empirics.

Laia Navarro-Sola

Laia is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her general research interests include human capital formation and development, economics of education, and the effects of human capital inequality on labor market outcomes. Her current research analyzes the malleability of non-cognitive skills through advanced educational practices using multidisciplinary measures. She also investigates the effect of disciplinary policies on student behavioral and academic outcomes.

Elena Pastorino

Elena Pastorino is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests are in the area of Labor Economics and Development Economics. Her research focuses on the determinants of individual careers in firms and in the labor market, on the importance of human capital and borrowing constraints for aggregate unemployment, and on the role of uncertainty and firm market power in labor and output markets in developed and developing countries.

Rong Hai

Rong Hai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Miami. She was previously a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Center for the Economics of Human Development and Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at University of Chicago from 2013 to 2016.. Her research interests are Public Economics, Labor Economics, Health Economics, and Household Finance.

Hai received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013.