Bobby Chung

Bobby Chung is a PhD candidate of Economics at Clemson University. His early works focus on the signaling aspect of occupational licensing.

Bobby's job market paper examines the importance of childhood environment by looking at how adults affect young people through social networks.

Le Wang

Le Wang is Chong K. Liew Chair and Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma. He currently serves as an Associate Editor of Econometric Reviews, Journal of Labor Research, and China Economic Review. He also holds a special term professorship at Jinan University. Prior to joining OU, he has held positions at the University of Alabama, the University of New Hampshire, and University of Minnesota. He was also a Women and Public Policy Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School. He received his Ph.D in Economics from Southern Methodist University in 2006 and his B.A.

Edoardo Ciscato

I am a PhD candidate at Sciences Po's Department of Economics in Paris. My Ph.D. thesis is supervised by Jean-Marc Robin (Sciences Po Paris, University College of London) and Alfred Galichon (Sciences Po Paris, New York University).

I work on a broad set of topics in household economics: marriage markets, divorce, family labor supply, human capital investment, fertility. I am especially interested in understanding the link between microeconomic behavior at the family level and aggregate inequality trends.

Hon Ho Kwok

Hon Ho Kwok is an Assistant Professor at the University of Hong Kong. His research focuses on econometrics, social interactions, and social networks.

Kwok received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his BEcon&Fin and MPhil from the University of Hong Kong.

Diego Daruich

Diego Daruich is a macroeconomist (broadly defined), with particular interests in human capital accumulation and early childhood development. He is currently on the job market as a Ph.D. candidate from New York University. Diego's job market paper studies the consequences of a large-scale and long-run government program that invests in early childhood development.

Leonardo Bursztyn

Leonardo Bursztyn is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on understanding how individuals make schooling, political, and financial decisions, and, in particular, how these decisions are shaped by individuals' social environment. His work has been published in leading journals such as the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Political Economy and the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Joseph Mullins

Joseph Mullins is an Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario. His current research examines how the incentives of various government policies affect child development by shaping parental decision-making. He has recently studied the effect of federal anti-poverty initiatives in the US on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children, using data to determine how mothers respond to different labor supply incentives, and the relative importance of two key resources - time and money - in the developmental process.

Aaron Sojourner

Sojourner is a labor economist and associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. His research focuses on three areas: (1) effects of labor-market institutions on economic productivity and in politics, (2) policies to promote efficient and equitable development of human capital with a focus on early childhood and K-12 education systems, and (3) behavioral economic approaches to consumer financial decisions. In 2016, he received the John T. Dunlop Scholar Award from the U.S.

Fan Wang

Fan Wang is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Houston. His areas of expertise are development economics, applied microeconomics, and labor. His research focuses on issues related to financial access and human capital formation in developing economies. Some of his recent work looks at the impact of formal credit market expansion on physical and human capital accumulation in Thailand. He is also studying the importance of financial and informational constraints in explaining the heterogeneity in early childhood human capital accumulation.