Xiaoyu Xia

Xiaoyu Xia a Senior Lecturer in Department of Economics at the University of Essex. Before joining Essex, she worked at the Chinese University of Hong Kong as an Assistant Professor. Her research fields are labor economics and behavioral economics. Xia's particular research interests are in youth labor market, education policy and China’s economy. Her recent research projects are focused on the empirical application of matching model in different labor market contexts, which include the taxi market, the marriage market, family living arrangements and college application.

Briana Ballis

Briana Ballis is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California-Merced. Her research interests are in labor and public economics. Much of her work focuses on studying the determinants of inequality in education. Through her work, she seeks to better understand how individuals’ educational investment decisions are shaped by their environments and backgrounds, and, in particular how policies or programs that impact vulnerable youth can sere to reduce (or exacerbate) pre-existing gaps in later life.

Daniel Millimet

Daniel Millimet is the Robert H. and Nancy Dedman Trustee Professor in the Department of Economics at Southern Methodist University and a research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). His research focuses on the theory and application of microeconometric methods, particularly methods designed to estimate causal effects and deal with measurement error. His applications span a diverse set of topics in labor, environmental, and health economics, as well as international trade.

Gueyon Kim

Gueyon Kim is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a trade economist, with particular interests in studying the labor market consequences of globalization and identifying the key determinants of inequality in a global economy. In her recent work, she uses the Danish employer-employee matched data to examine the impact of offshoring on worker-firm matching and wage inequality.

Mariana Laverde

Mariana Laverde is a postdoctoral associate at the Tobin Center at Yale University and will be an assistant professor in economics at Boston College starting in the summer of 2021. Her research focuses on applied market design and the economics of education. In particular, she studies the equity gains associated with algorithm-based assignments to allocate seats in public schools, as well as teachers’ dynamic preferences for schools and the geographic distribution of school quality.

Conrad Miller

Conrad Miller is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Haas School of Business. He is a labor economist with research interests in firm sorting and discrimination.

Zhixiu Yu

Zhixiu Yu is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She will be on the job market during the 2022-2023 academic year.

Myra Yazbeck

Myra Yazbeck is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa. She received her PhD in Economics from Université Laval in 2011. In 2012, she completed a year of post-doctoral studies at McGill University, Department of Epidemiology Biostatistics and Occupational Health, where she developed a research agenda on health inequalities. Yazbeck's dissertation focuses on the impact of social networks on health outcomes. Her research interests are mainly in the field of health economics, social interactions/networks and inequality.

Amanda Agan

Amanda Agan is Assistant Professor of Economics and Affiliated Professor in the Program in Criminal Justice at Rutgers University. Her research uses both quasi-experimental and field experimental methods to answer policy-relevant questions in criminal justice and labor economics. She has published several papers related to inequality, discrimination, and crime in leading peer-reviewed economics journals, including the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the Review of Economics and Statistics.

Alex Imas

Alex Imas’s research examines how people learn and make decisions over time. Most recently, he studied how incorrect beliefs both feed into and propagate discrimination. Using formal theory and empirics, he shows that the evolution of discrimination—whether it is mitigated or exacerbated—depends critically on the extent of bias in the evaluation process and people’s awareness of it.

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