Nirav Mehta

Nirav Mehta is an assistant professor of Economics at the University of Western Ontario. He is a labor economist who studies topics in education and health. Mehta is currently studying the effects of social interactions, school choice, ability tracking, teacher incentive schemes, and contracting in health care.

Dana Goldman

Dana Goldman is the Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair and a Distinguished Professor of Pharmacy, Public Policy, and Economics at the University of Southern California. He also directs the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, a centerpiece of one of the nation’s premier health policy and management programs (ranked #3 in 2016 by US News & World Report). Dr. Goldman is the author of over 200 articles and book chapters. He is a health policy advisor to the Congressional Budget Office, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Institute, Covered California, and several health care companies.

Ging Cee Ng

Ging Cee Ng is a Ph.D. student in economics with interests in Microeconomic Theory and Public Economics. Prior to Chicago, she worked in the Research and Statistics Group at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where she worked on research and policy projects in corporate finance, monetary policy, and macroeconomics.

Stefanie Schurer

Stefanie Schurer is an Associate Professor in the School of Economics at the University of Sydney. Her research interest is the Economics of Human Development. Most of her current projects explore the evolution of skills, preferences, and health over the lifecourse and the role that parents and the public sector play in determining these skills. She is involved in several linked administrative data projects in Australia, evaluating among others the impact of early-life medical care and cash/in-kind transfers on children’s skill development.

Bertil Tungodden

Bertil Tungodden is a professor at the Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics (NHH), since 2002, where he defended his PhD in 1995. He is co-director of the research group The Choice Lab at NHH. Tungodden is also an Associated Senior Researcher at Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI) and at several Centers of Excellence, funded by the Research Council of Norway. He was Chairman of the Norwegian Scientific Council for Economics, 2007–2009.

Kate Ho

Kate Ho is a Professor of Economics and the Co-director of the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University. Prior to this, she was an Associate Professor of Economics at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the industrial organization of the medical care market.

Alexander Teytelboym

Alexander Teytelboym is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Oxford, and a Tutorial Fellow at St. Catherine's College. He is also Deputy Director, Economics of Sustainability at the Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment, a Research Fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, and a co-founder of Refugees' Say. His main research interests are market design and networks, as well as their applications to environmental economics. Recently, Teytelboym has been working on the design of matching markets for refugee resettlement.

Andrey Fradkin

Andrey Fradkin is a postdoctoral associate at the Initiative on the Digital Economy at MIT. He studies the effects of digital technologies on the economy, the design of online platforms, and the economics of search and matching markets. With regard to platform design, he has studied and worked to implement search and matching algorithms, reputation systems, experimentation policies, and user acquisition strategies at Airbnb, Inc. He has also provided expert input on these topics to the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the Federal Trade Commission. 

Alan Caniglia

Caniglia was a full time economics professor at Franklin & Marshall from 1982 to 1999 at which time he joined the administration. His current role as Vice President for Planning includes, in addition to the obvious planning work for F&M, researching and implementing policies regarding access, success, demonstrating the values of a liberal arts education, and how students make decisions regarding attending a college or university.

Laia Navarro-Sola

Laia Navarro-Sola is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on human capital and education in developing countries. Her current research investigates the long-run effects of expanding access to secondary education in a developing country context through schools that use televised lessons. Navarro-Sola’s research also examines whether a school’s impact on high-stakes exams is a good measure of its overall life impact on students, and whether parents value high-stakes tests, long-run outcomes, or both.