Andrey Fradkin

Andrey Fradkin is a postdoctoral associate at the Initiative on the Digital Economy at MIT. He studies the effects of digital technologies on the economy, the design of online platforms, and the economics of search and matching markets. With regard to platform design, he has studied and worked to implement search and matching algorithms, reputation systems, experimentation policies, and user acquisition strategies at Airbnb, Inc. He has also provided expert input on these topics to the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the Federal Trade Commission. 

Alan Caniglia

Caniglia was a full time economics professor at Franklin & Marshall from 1982 to 1999 at which time he joined the administration. His current role as Vice President for Planning includes, in addition to the obvious planning work for F&M, researching and implementing policies regarding access, success, demonstrating the values of a liberal arts education, and how students make decisions regarding attending a college or university.

Laia Navarro-Sola

Laia Navarro-Sola is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her research areas of interest are the economics of education and human capital formation in developing countries. Her current research investigates the long-run effects of expanding secondary education in a developing country context through the construction of schools that use televised lessons.

Damon Jones

Damon Jones is an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy. He conducts research at the intersection of three fields within economics. First, there is public finance, the field of economics that analyzes government taxation and spending, using models of choice to predict the effects of policy and economic notions of well-being to measure the policy’s benefit or harm to consumers. Second is household finance, the branch of economics that focuses on the financial decisions, saving, borrowing and insurance, at the household level.

Manuel Trajtenberg

Trajtenberg has been a Professor of Economics at Tel Aviv University since 1984. Currently he serves as a member of the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament for the (opposition) Labor Party, for which he was candidate for Finance Minister. Prof. Trajtenberg headed the Higher Education system in Israel from 2009 through 2014 (e.g. Chairman of the Planning and Budgeting Committee of the Council of Higher Education), and prior to that served as (first) Head of the National Economic Council at the Prime Minister Office (2006-2009).

Reuben Gronau

Reuben Gronau is Professor of Economics (emeritus) at the Hebrew University at Jerusalem (Israel). He served as Visiting Professor at UCLA, Stanford University, MIT, The University of Chicago, Columbia University, Princeton, Northwestern, and The New School (Moscow). He has published several books and articles in the area of theoretical and empirical household behavior, labor market participation, transportation economics, and public utilities regulation. He played a major role in in setting the rates of public utilities in Israel (electricity, water, and phone rates).

Marion Goussé

Marion Goussé is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Economics at Laval University (Québec City). Her research interests are in labor economics and the economics of the family, including issues such as inequality and assortative mating, intra-household allocation of resources, women labor supply and discrimination.

Goussé received an M.Sc in Economics at ENSAE (Paris) in 2010 and a PhD in Economics from Sciences Po Paris in 2014.

Zvika Neeman

Zvika Neeman  held positions at Boston University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and is now a professor of economics at Tel Aviv University.

His main research areas is economic and game theory and in particular the theory of mechanism design. He is also interested in law and economics.

Neeman completed his Ph.D. in Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences at Northwestern University in 1995.

Ashok Rai

Ashok Rai is an Associate Professor of Economics at Williams College. His research is on the inequality that arises from unequal financial access. He has written on microfinance design and is now working on the global coffee trade.

Rai has a B.A. from Stanford University, a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.