Ian Fillmore

Ian Fillmore is an Assistant Professor of economics at Washington University in St. Louis. He is interested in the intersection of industrial organization, labor economics, and econometrics. His current areas of research include the economics of education and education markets, the effects of technological change on workers, and optimal taxation.

Briana Ballis

Briana Ballis is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California-Merced. Her research interests are in labor and public economics. Much of her work focuses on studying the determinants of inequality in education. Through her work, she seeks to better understand how individuals’ educational investment decisions are shaped by their environments and backgrounds, and, in particular how policies or programs that impact vulnerable youth can sere to reduce (or exacerbate) pre-existing gaps in later life.

Mariana Laverde

Mariana Laverde is a postdoctoral associate at the Tobin Center at Yale University and will be an assistant professor in economics at Boston College starting in the summer of 2021. Her research focuses on applied market design and the economics of education. In particular, she studies the equity gains associated with algorithm-based assignments to allocate seats in public schools, as well as teachers’ dynamic preferences for schools and the geographic distribution of school quality.

Jun Hyung Kim

Jun Hyung Kim is an assistant professor of economics at the Institute of Economic and Social Research at Jinan University. His research is focused on parenting and child development, with particular attention on how life cycle decisions of parents interact with parenting decisions. His job market paper highlights the role of parenting skill in the realization of parenting style in the household, and the heterogeneous effects of parenting behavior on child development.

Jorge Luis Garcia

Jorge Luis García is an Assistant Professor in the John E. Walker Department of Economics at Clemson University. He is also a Visiting Research Fellow at the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University and a Quintiles Fellow at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at the University of Southern California. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago.

Nirav Mehta

Nirav Mehta is an assistant professor of Economics at the University of Western Ontario. He is a labor economist who studies topics in education and health. Mehta is currently studying the effects of social interactions, school choice, ability tracking, teacher incentive schemes, and contracting in health care.

Teodora Boneva

Teodora Boneva is Professor of Applied Microeconomics in the Department of Economics at the University of Bonn. Previously, she was Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Zurich, Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Oxford, and a British Academy Post-doctoral fellow at the University College London (Department of Economics). Her general research interests include child development, human capital formation, and socio-economic inequality.

Juanna Schrøter Joensen

Juanna Schrøter Joensen is a Research Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of individual human capital investments, which are key to understanding income and wealth inequality. In her research, she quantifies how incentives and circumstances interact with endowments and information in shaping human capital. She highlights important aspects of heterogeneity in human capital and its interaction with institutions and public policies; such as financial aid, choice sets, curricula, and grading.

Seda Ertac

Seda Ertac is an associate professor of economics at Koc University. Dr. Ertac completed a 1.5-year postdoctoral study at the economics department of the University of Chicago, and joined Koc University in February 2008. Dr. Ertac’s main field of research is experimental economics. Her work explores the malleability of non-cognitive skills and the development of preferences in children, gender differences in economic behavior, and the effects of informational and incentive policies on self-confidence, motivation and performance in organizational and educational settings. Dr.

Michela Tincani

Michela Tincani is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) at University College London, and a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Tincani is an empirical microeconomist interested in social inequalities. Her papers combine administrative microdata and quasi-experimental data variation with insights from applied microeconomic theory (dynamic decision-making, general equilibrium, and game theoretic models of social interactions). In ongoing work, she is collecting data on a large randomized experiment on education policy. This approach has two goals.