Heather Sarsons

Heather Sarsons is an economist with research interests in labor, personnel, and behavioral economics. Much of her work focuses on understanding how norms, stereotypes, and biases influence labor market outcomes and inequality.

Naibao Zhao

Naibao Zhao is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Research Institute of Economics and Management (RIEM), Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE), Chengdu China. His broad research field is empirical microeconomics that integrates economic theory with empirical evidence by using rigorous econometric analysis to study policy-relevant questions. In particular, his research covers a wide range of topics, including inequality, education, and human development.

Robert Collinson

Rob is the Wilson Family LEO Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the Univeristy of Notre Dame. He is an applied microeconomist with research interests in housing policy, urban policy, and the design of anti-poverty programs.

Yana Gallen

Yana Gallen is an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. She is a labor economist studying the gender wage gap. Her research focuses on understanding the sources of the gender pay gap--preferences, discrimination, or productivity? She is also interested in the impact of family friendly policies on the labor market, particularly looking at indirect or unanticipated effects of policy reforms. Many of her projects use Danish register data linking workers and firms.

Shoshana Grossbard

Shoshana Grossbard is Professor of Economics emerita at San Diego State University. Her research interests include labor economics, economics of the family, economics of gender, and law and economics. Most of her research deals with the economics of marriage. She earned her B.A. degree in Economics and Sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and her Ph.D in Economics at the University of Chicago.

Eric Chyn

Eric Chyn is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Virginia (UVA) and a Faculty Research Fellow at the Rhode Island Innovative Policy Lab (RIIPL) at Brown University. His primary research fields are labor and public economics. In recent work, he has studied the impact of moving out of disadvantaged neighborhoods on the long-run outcomes of children.

Chyn received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan in 2016 and a B.B.A. in Economics from Baylor University in 2006.

Kevin Thom

Kevin Thom is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Prior to this, he was a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at New York University. He is an applied microeconomist with interests in labor, health, and household financial decision-making. Kevin's recent work explores how molecular genetic data can be used to better understand the heterogeneity that drives health behaviors, human capital accumulation, and household financial outcomes.

Laia Navarro-Sola

Laia Navarro-Sola is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on human capital and education in developing countries. Her current research investigates the long-run effects of expanding access to secondary education in a developing country context through schools that use televised lessons. Navarro-Sola’s research also examines whether a school’s impact on high-stakes exams is a good measure of its overall life impact on students, and whether parents value high-stakes tests, long-run outcomes, or both.

Ian Coxhead

Ian Coxhead is an economist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He specializes in the study of growth, trade and development, with a regional focus on the emerging and transitional economies of Asia. His research is focused on labor markets, migration and educational choices as the primary mechanisms through which individuals and households in such economies are affected by and respond to changes in economic conditions emanating from policy reform, globalization and real global shocks.

Josh Kinsler

Josh Kinsler is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at the University of Georgia. Professor Kinsler’s research is focused on the economics of education, both at the primary and secondary levels. At the primary school level, Professor Kinsler has examined the robustness of common value-added models for evaluating teacher effectiveness, racial disparities in school discipline, and the impact of discipline on student and school outcomes. In higher education, Prof.