Hanzhe Zhang

Hanzhe Zhang has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Michigan State University since August 2015.  His research and teaching interests are microeconomics, matching theory, game theory, labor economics, and family economics. In particular, he is interested in price-theoretical and game-theoretical analyses of human capital investments and their consequences in the labor market and the marriage market.

Zhang received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 2015 and a B.A. and an M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010.

Fabian Kosse

Fabian Kosse is Professor of Economics at LMU Munich and Research Affiliate at the Institute of Behavior and Inequality (briq). Prior to this, he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute for Applied Microeconomics (University of Bonn). His main fields of interests are economics and psychology, and applied microeconomics.

He received a Ph.D. in Economics from the Bonn Graduate School of Economics (BGSE). Previously, he studied Economics and Management at the University of Mannheim and the University of Miami.

Barbara Wolfe

Barbara Wolfe is the Richard A. Easterlin Professor of Economics, Population Health Sciences, and Public Affairs and Faculty Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses broadly on poverty and health issues.

Ian Coxhead

Ian Coxhead is an economist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He specializes in the study of growth, trade and development, with a regional focus on the emerging and transitional economies of Asia. His research is focused on labor markets, migration and educational choices as the primary mechanisms through which individuals and households in such economies are affected by and respond to changes in economic conditions emanating from policy reform, globalization and real global shocks.

Shuaizhang Feng

Shuaizhang Feng is Professor and Dean of the Institute for Economic and Social Research at Jinan University, Guangzhou China. He is also a Research Fellow at IZA since December 2008. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University in 2006. He has published in journals such as American Economic Review, Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Review of Economics and Statistics, and Journal of Business and Economic Statistics.

Josh Kinsler

Josh Kinsler is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at the University of Georgia. Professor Kinsler’s research is focused on the economics of education, both at the primary and secondary levels. At the primary school level, Professor Kinsler has examined the robustness of common value-added models for evaluating teacher effectiveness, racial disparities in school discipline, and the impact of discipline on student and school outcomes. In higher education, Prof.

Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln

Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln is professor for Macroeconomics and Development at Goethe University Frankfurt. Prior to joining the faculty of Goethe University in 2009, she was an assistant professor at Harvard University. Her research focuses on the analysis of household saving and labor supply behavior, labor market integration, and the endogeneity of preferences. She has published among others in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the German Federal Ministry of Finance.

Plamen Nikolov

Plamen Nikolov is Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at The State University of New York (at Binghamton) and Affiliated Professor at The Harvard University Institute for Quantitative Social Studies. His expertise is in the design and execution of randomized control trials (RCTs) and cohort studies in resource-limited settings. Using mainly experimental methods, his research focuses on health, education and finance in developing countries including topics such as economics of HIV, primary education, labor markets and barriers to faster technology adoption.

Elena Pastorino

Elena Pastorino is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests are in the area of Labor Economics and Development Economics. Her research focuses on the determinants of individual careers in firms and in the labor market, on the importance of human capital and borrowing constraints for aggregate unemployment, and on the role of uncertainty and firm market power in labor and output markets in developed and developing countries.

Joseph Kaboski

Joseph P. Kaboski is the David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame and a Fellow of the Kellogg Institute. His research focuses on growth, development and international economics, with an emphasis on structural change, finance and development, schooling and growth, microfinance, explaining international relative price patterns, and the role of inventories in international trade.