Stuart Butler

Stuart Butler is a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. Prior to joining Brookings, he spent 35 years at The Heritage Foundation, as Director of the Center for Policy Innovation and earlier as Vice-President for Domestic and Economic Policy Studies. He is also currently an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy and a Visiting Fellow at the Convergence Center for Policy Resolution.

Scott Winship

Scott Winship is the Walter B. Wriston Fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. Previously a fellow at the Brookings Institution, his areas of expertise include living standards and economic mobility, inequality, and insecurity. Winship is a contributor to Forbes.com, and his research has been published in City Journal, National Affairs, National Review, POLITICO, Wilson Quarterly, and Breakthrough Journal, among other outlets. Recently, Winship contributed a chapter to the reform-conservative volume “Room to Grow” (YG Network, 2014).

Camelia Kuhnen

Camelia Kuhnen is an Associate Professor of Finance at the University of North Carolina -- Kenan-Flagler Business School. Dr. Kuhnen's research spans neuroeconomics, behavioral finance and corporate finance. Her work has an interdisciplinary nature, with the over-arching theme of trying to understand how people make financial and economic choices that concern them as individuals or as decision makers in firms. Her dual training in finance and neuroscience led her to conduct research in the new field of neuroeconomics. In this work Dr.

Nathaniel Hendren

Nathaniel Hendren joined the economics department at Harvard University in July 2013 as an assistant professor. His scholarship focuses on health, information, labor, and public economics, including credit market distortions, optimal taxation, welfare measurement, and insurance regulation. Hendren spent the 2012–2013 academic year at the National Bureau of Economic Research on a post-doctoral fellowship studying issues related to health and aging.

Gregorio Caetano

Gregorio Caetano is an Assistant Professor of Economics in the University of Rochester. His research interests are Social Interactions, Urban Economics, Local Public Economics, Education, Labor Economics and Applied Econometrics.

Caetano received a B.A. in Economics from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in 2000, an M.A. in Economics from Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV-RJ) in 2003, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley in 2009.

Xu Lin

Xu Lin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wayne State University. Her research fields include Econometrics, Labor Economics and Health Economics. She is particularly interested in theoretical specifications and estimations of spatial autoregressive models, as well as empirical applications of theses models to analyze social interaction effects in a variety of behaviors and outcomes. Prior to joining Wayne State University, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Tsinghua University, P.R.China.

Jan Stuhler

Jan Stuhler is Assistant Professor at the Department of Economics at Universidad Carlos II de Madrid, Research Affiliate at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), and Visiting Researcher at the Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).

His research focuses on applied microeconomics, with recent work on intergenerational mobility and a focus is on measurement and interpretation. He also works on migration, with particular attention to its effect on local labor markets. 

Rusty Tchernis

Rusty Tchernis is a Professor of Economics in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). His primary areas of research are Applied Econometrics, Health Economics, and Labor Economics. Within these fields he is interested in program evaluation, spatial econometrics, and Bayesian methods, as well as the economics of childhood obesity.

Jeffrey Smith

Jeffrey Smith is the Paul T. Heyne Professor of Economics and Richard Meese Professor of Applied Econometrics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was previously Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. From 1994 to 2001 he was on the faculty at the University of Western Ontario and from 2001 to 2005 he was on the faculty at the University of Maryland. His research centers on experimental and non-experimental methods for the evaluation of interventions, with particular application to social and educational programs.

Mark Rosenzweig

Mark Rosenzweig is the Frank Altschul Professor of International Economics and director of the Economic Growth Center at Yale University. He taught previously at Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Minnesota. He has made seminal contributions to understanding economic development by combining theory with shrewd empirical work, with the latter focused mainly in South Asia and China.