Laia Navarro-Sola

Laia is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Her general research interests include human capital formation and development, economics of education, and the effects of human capital inequality on labor market outcomes. Her current research analyzes the malleability of non-cognitive skills through advanced educational practices using multidisciplinary measures. She also investigates the effect of disciplinary policies on student behavioral and academic outcomes.

Manuel Trajtenberg

Trajtenberg has been a Professor of Economics at Tel Aviv University since 1984. Currently he serves as a member of the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament for the (opposition) Labor Party, for which he was candidate for Finance Minister. Prof. Trajtenberg headed the Higher Education system in Israel from 2009 through 2014 (e.g. Chairman of the Planning and Budgeting Committee of the Council of Higher Education), and prior to that served as (first) Head of the National Economic Council at the Prime Minister Office (2006-2009).

Shuaizhang Feng

Shuaizhang Feng is professor and dean of the institute for economic and social research at Jinan University, Guangzhou China. He is also a Research Fellow at IZA since December 2008. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University in 2006. He has published in journals such as American Economic Review, Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Review of Economics and Statistics, and Journal of Business and Economic Statistics.

Josh Kinsler

Josh Kinsler is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at the University of Georgia. Professor Kinsler’s research is focused on the economics of education, both at the primary and secondary levels. At the primary school level, Professor Kinsler has examined the robustness of common value-added models for evaluating teacher effectiveness, racial disparities in school discipline, and the impact of discipline on student and school outcomes. In higher education, Prof.

Jee Peng Tan

Jee Peng Tan retired from the World Bank in December 2013 following a fulfilling 32-year career. She was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the National University of Singapore during July-Dec 2014 where she taught the Business School’s inaugural undergraduate course on Measuring Success in Philanthropy and Impact Investing.

Raj Chetty

Raj Chetty is the Bloomberg Professor of Economics at Harvard University. Chetty's research combines empirical evidence and economic theory to help design more effective government policies. His work on tax policy, unemployment insurance, and education has been widely cited in media outlets and Congressional testimony. His current research focuses on equality of opportunity: how can we give children from disadvantaged backgrounds better chances of succeeding?

Sian Beilock

Sian Beilock is a professor in the Department of Psychology at The University of Chicago. Her research program sits at the intersection of cognitive science and education. She explores the cognitive and neural substrates of skill learning as well as the mechanisms by which performance breaks down in high-stress or high-pressure situations.

Marianne Y. Haramoto

Marianne is a graduate student at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. She is currently working on a skill formation production function study to estimate the determinants of preschool impacts using administrative data. Based on these non-experimental studies, she is planning to test the effectiveness of multiple random treatments by improving some of the preschools' inputs, or teaching methodologies.

Her previous experience includes strategic planning and continuous improvement for the mining, manufacturing and agriculture sectors in South America.

Anjali Adukia

Anjali Adukia’ is an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy. Her research is focused on understanding factors that influence educational decisions and the potential role for institutions such as government agencies and non-profit organizations to improve child outcomes, particularly at the intersection of education and health. Her current work examines how the provision of basic needs - such as sanitation, clothing, and transportation - can increase school participation in developing contexts.

Hideo Akabayashi

Hideo Akabayashi is a Professor of Economics at Keio University. His research areas are in economics of education and family economics. His publications include an economic theory of child development and empirical investigations concerning the effects of class size and private school vouchers in Japan.