Chase Corbin

Chase Corbin is a graduate student in Economics. He completed his B.A. in Economics and in Philosophy at the University of Florida, and received his M.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago, with a focus in Economics in 2015. His research interests include socioeconomic inequality, the social determinants of health, and computational econometrics.

Andros Kourtellos

Andros Kourtellos is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Cyprus. His primary research interests are econometrics, inequality, social mobility, economic growth, and macroeconomics. His work has documented the existence of status traps in intergenerational mobility, which can reduce the impact of favorable shocks or interventions for disadvantaged children and so hinder upward mobility. Recently, he also developed estimation and inference for a structural threshold regression model, which is particularly useful for the estimation of multiple equilibria and poverty traps.

Xu Lin

Xu Lin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wayne State University. Her research fields include Econometrics, Labor Economics and Health Economics. She is particularly interested in theoretical specifications and estimations of spatial autoregressive models, as well as empirical applications of theses models to analyze social interaction effects in a variety of behaviors and outcomes. Prior to joining Wayne State University, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Tsinghua University, P.R.China.

Jeffrey Smith

Jeffrey Smith is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. From 1994 to 2001 he was on the faculty at the University of Western Ontario and from 2001 to 2005 he was on the faculty at the University of Maryland. His research centers on experimental and non-experimental methods for the evaluation of interventions, with particular application to social and educational programs. He has also written papers examining the labor market effects of university quality and the use of statistical treatment rules to assign persons to government programs.

Motohiro Yogo

Motohiro Yogo is a Monetary Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. His research areas are asset pricing, household finance, and econometrics.

Yogo earned an A.B. in Economics from Princeton in 2000 and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 2004.

Elie Tamer

Elie Tamer is the Robert E. and Emily King Professor of Business Institutions at Northwestern University. He is an econometrician that is interested in the relationship between models that economists are interested and the data that are observed. In particular, his research is related to the inference question that arises when confronting models with multiple decision makers, such as a family, to data on outcomes from these markets.

Christopher Taber

After being at Northwestern University since 1995, Christopher Taber joined the University of Wisconsin--Madison faculty in Fall 2007 as the Richard A. Meese Chair of Applied Econometrics. His research focuses on the development and implementation of econometric models of skill formation. His work on economics of education includes studies of the effectiveness of Catholic schools and of voucher programs, the importance of borrowing constraints in college going decisions, and general equilibrium models of the labor market.

Robert J. Sampson

Robert J. Sampson is Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University and Director of the Social Sciences Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. He taught at the University of Chicago for twelve years before moving to Harvard in 2003. Sampson was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2008 and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He was elected President of the American Society of Criminology for 2011-2012.

Krishna Pendakur

Krishna Pendakur is a Professor of Economics at Simon Fraser university. He spent the last 18 years studying statistical and econometric issues relating to the measurement of economic discrimination, inequality and poverty. A group of papers (jointly written with Ravi Pendakur) established that visible minorities and Aboriginal people face great disparity in Canadian labour markets, and that this disparity shows no sign of eroding over time. A more recent group of our papers has shown that Aboriginal people face staggeringly poor labour market outcomes.

Stefano Mosso

Stefano Mosso is a Quantitative Research Associate at AQR Capital Management. His current research focuses on issues related to labor economics and econometrics with particular attention to the study of the returns to education, the dynamics of the labor market and the determinants of inequality. He received a Laurea in Political Science from the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies of Pisa, a Double Degree in International Political Economy from Sciences-Po Paris and the London School of Economics and a Master in Economics from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra.