Working Papers

This paper investigates gender differentials in citations of articles published in two journals specialized in Demographic Economics, a field that has traditionally attracted relatively large numbers of women researchers.

The black-white differences in marriages in the US are striking. While 83% of white women between ages 25 and 54 were ever married in 2006, only 56% of black women were: a gap of 27 percentage points.

Using individual life expectancies to calculate life expectancies for couples (the expected years both spouses will be alive) yields substantially misleading results because the mortality distributions of husbands and wives overlap substantially. We show how to calculate joint life expectancies for couples and life expectancies for surviving spouses taking account of the overlap in mortality distributions.

We first document three stylized facts about marriage and fertility in East Asian societies: They have the highest marriage rates in the world, but the lowest total fertility; they have the lowest total fertility, but almost all married women have at least one child.

We use a unique dataset to analyze marriage and union patterns of the European nobility from the 1500s to the 1800s.

The American family underwent important transformations in the last decades. Mating patterns changed, college graduates and high earners marry with each other more and more frequently.

Using a randomized control trial, we examine whether offering adolescent girls non-material resources – specifically, negotiation skills – can improve educational outcomes in a low-income country.

This paper investigates marriage market equilibrium under the assumption that Bargaining In Marriage (BIM) determines allocation within marriage.

We document evidence on preferences for childbearing in developing countries. Across countries, men usually desire larger families than women do.