Working Papers

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Adverse conditions in early life can have consequential impacts on individuals' health in older age. In one of the first papers on this topic, Barker and Osmond (1986) show a strong positive relationship between infant mortality rates in the 1920s and ischaemic heart disease in the 1970s.

This paper is motivated by the dearth of statistical capacity in the Middle East North Africa region and the unprecedented economic collapse in Lebanon.

This chapter provides new evidence on educational inequality and reviews the literature on the causes and consequences of unequal education.

Federal financial aid depends on a student's Expected Family Contribution (EFC)--the higher her EFC, the less aid a student receives.

This paper studies how spousal bargaining power affects consumption patterns of married households in the US, using a detailed barcode-level dataset.

We present a theory of human capital, with its two most essential components, health capital and, what we term, skill capital, endogenously determined within the model.

The UK Universal Credit (UC) welfare reform simplified the benefits system whilst strongly incentivising a return to sustainable employment. Exploiting a staggered roll-out, we estimate the differential effect of entering unemployment under UC versus the former system on mental health.

I study the trade-induced restructuring process using a novel measure of new work that captures the firm’s demand for jobs employing new knowledge, skills, and technologies. To construct measures of new work, I identify newly emerged job titles using word embedding models.

We analyze marital matching on income using an extremely rich Dutch data set containing all income tax files over four years. We develop a novel methodology that directly extends previous contributions to allow for highly flexible matching patterns.