Working Papers

China’s college expansion program, which was implemented in 1999 significantly increased the share of college-educated workers in the urban labor force. We find that returns to education were not responsive to changes in local skill supply be- tween then and 2009.

Understanding inequality and devising policies to alleviate it was a central focus of Jan Tinbergen's lifetime research. He was far ahead of his time in many aspects of his work.

We present results from a new data set, the Statistics of Income Mobility Panel, that has been assembled from tax and other administrative sources to provide evidence on economic mobility and persistence in the United States.

Is a school’s impact on high-stakes test scores a good measure of its overall impact on students? Do parents value school impacts on high-stakes tests, longer-run outcomes, or both?

This paper uses state police stop data in Texas to assess patrol activity. We find that both the types of stops and the allocation of resources over space change in darkness relative to daylight, and that the changes in stop type and manpower allocation are correlated within police officers.

We evaluate the impact of a conditional cash transfer (CCT) program that we designed on family well-being among low-income families with young children.

We exploit state variation in licensing laws to study the effect of licensing on occupational choice using a boundary discontinuity design. We find that licensing reduces equilibrium labor supply by an average of 17%-27%.

Using Danish matched employer-employee data, I compare the relative pay of men and women to their relative productivity as measured by production function estimation.